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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,537 (some duplicates have been removed)
thean francisco about california imitation of the healthcare law. >> good morning, everyone. good morning, everyone. thank you, chancellor, for your introduction. more importantly, for your extraordinary leadership. under your leadership, although things you described about ucsf are becoming a reality, following in the footsteps of the state chancellors, the first woman chancellor, a great leader across the country. a physician, scientist, and a businesswoman, private, public, nonprofit, experienced. you bring a depth of experience to your latest role as the first woman chancellor of ucsf, the birthplace of the biotech industry and the nation's crown jewel of biomedical research. that is how we see it. thanks to your vision, ucsf is devoting its mission to advance health worldwide by molding future leaders in health sciences, education, discovery, and patient care. by providing high-quality care to community clinics, by conducting innovative research at institutions across the globe, and by partnering with health organizations like covered california, ucsf is advancing the health
(applause) >> well, thank you and welcome to california. it's a great place to come and talk about solar energy because we are in the forefront of certainly the rest of the states, probably -- in fact, certainly in the western hemisphere, california is in the lead. and that's important. but being in the lead doesn't mean we've arrived at the goal. got a long way to go and i hope the work you do here, the conversations, the relationships that are formed can help advance the cause of solar energy and renewable energy or generally. back when i was governor the first time, that was a long time ago -- some of you folks weren't even born then -- not too many. i see a few gray hairs here who are hanging around. that was a long time ago, 38 years ago, as a matter of fact. very few people get to be governor 38 years after they first started. [laughter] >> with a 28-year hiatus. (applause) so, i guess i have to expiate my many political sins and i spent time in the wilderness. but i am back and i can reflect on how politics work, how it worked then, what's happened in the meantime, challenge
or unbundled, but it does matter what type of resource it was associated with. that gets you to the california law, which it does apply to any cca that's created up to 33%. from that, the recs, there's three buckets in there, the two most important buckets are bucket 1 and bucket 3. bucket 1 says it has to be an unbundled or a bundled transaction from a facility that can deliver electricity in the california or located in the california. so, no unbundled rec in bucket 1. bucket 3 is unbundled recs and some other things in there, and the percentages that are attached to those over time, most importantly by 2020 no more than 10% of unbundled recs can be in that 33% procurement. however -- >> excuse me. very fascinating. since we're over time, i'd like for him to tell me a little bit more about the rec limit page. could you do that? thank you. >> maybe why there is a limit, for example. >>> let me go back to this page. the categories, and to clarify again to make the point, this applies, this is state law, it would apply to sf clean energy or clean energy sf. up to the 33% procurement. anything a
in williamsport. japan a winner, california looks like it's on its way to a victory over connecticut to set up our little league championship game tomorrow. 3:00 eastern on abc. >> orel: how is this, grant holman is up. grand slam, two run home run. and you got matt brown, who is going to get his feet wet for the first time on the mound. >> nomar: i love the attitude of the connecticut manager who knows the game is a little out of whack, and he's going to let some kids experience something a little different here in williamsport. >> karl: this is size on size here. and the first pitch in there for a called strike. holman had a single, prior to that he had two hits, and both were home runs. two pitches. two strikes. grant holman looks down on felix hernandez by an inch. >> orel: they're the same when it comes to grand slams and no hitters. >> karl: two strikes. two men on. two men down. doesn't chase that one. no advancement by the runners. the coaches of these teams, very complimentary about the other coaches for the other teams. they often times hang out together. get friendly with them. they're
concentration area. there are no protests is recorded with the california department of alcoholic beverage control and letter of support is located with the california beverage control. there's no opposition from police station and alu recommendation is approval. >> thank you very much, inspector, colleagues, any questions for inspector fong? why don't we now open it up to public comment. is there any member of the public who would like to speak on this item? seeing none, public comment is closed. again, we heard from the applicant, we heard from the police department. there are no speakers. i know that the district supervisor in in support of this request, so if we can entertain a motion. >> i did want to say that though my office is working with supervisor kim and cohen on getting stores to display more healthy options in the front of their store, especially whole grains frush produce and non-fat milk, many types of items as opposed to junk food, alcohol and cigarettes, but i still see that this is supported by the district supervisor and i'll be supportive of this item. >> great, thank
power is greenhouse gas free, california produced, and with unionized maintenance. >> okay, thanks. so, if you can walk us through the renewable character in city. we had at the last discussion policy committee, we talked about recs and what that does or doesn't do to some of the other goals and the jobs piece, if you can move us forward with that. >> yes. and just quickly, there are sort of three aspects to this program design that we've been trying to balance in response to concerns about public officials. one is affordability. there were a lot of concerns about a 14.57 [speaker not understood] when i came in april. we're aware that everybody wants the greenest product with the highest quality products. and that we need to have resources for local bills, which is what you're just referring to for buying and purchasing renewable energy steps produced in the city. and for energy efficiency projects. so, going on to the next slide, a few things have changed in our favor since the board of supervisors' vote in 2012. prices for renewable products have fallen. pg&e has proposed a green tar
posted on what comes out of this today. >> reporter: i will. >> california governor jerry brown has declared a state of emergency. look at these flames tearing through acres of woodlands of yosemite national park. officials say it's one of the largest in california history, and that is saying something. the fear now is that millions of people in northern california could lose their water and electricity. we have the latest. >> so to provide us the latest updates on the fire is teen i can't walker from california governor's office of emergency service. she joins us from california. i think what people find the most interesting is this is affecting people as far as the northernest part of the state. could you explain that to us? >> reporter: the rim fire has made substantial impact statewide. we have air quality impacts and we have the fire threatening the watererwater reservoir. we have the impacts of the fire of the county and of the water reservoir that supports san francisco county and they are clean water system. >> are you having to pull in people from other states? ho are you o
service california, isn't all natural gas or all one resource so there's less chance of market manipulation. that was a lesson from the energy crisis in 2001. local air pollution, again, it matters where the power is coming from. if it's a wind farm in texas and it can't be delivered into california. you still need to have generation in california so it doesn't clean california there. it reduces carbon, but it doesn't eliminate nox or particulate matter. that's how the buckets were set up. however, the reason some bundled recs are allowed and some out of state resources are allowed -- i shouldn't say it's not actually technically out of state. they can't deliver into california. they are allowed. there is some advantage to having some diversity in the utilities procurement plans. so that a few resources in california can't drive up the price. so, there's some advantages to keeping the overall price of the portfolio lower if you can have some mix in those resources. >> commissioner king, is that from the previous question? >> i guess. >> any other questions from commissioners? >
. the rim wildfire is now threatening california's yosemite national park. two groves of sec/ias. >>> keeping watch over the zoo's newest resident. a baby panned a. no bigger than a stick of butter. it's her third. her second cub was born last year but died after a week. the new panda's gender has yet to be determined. and it's name will be decided when it's about 100 days old. go to aljazeera.com. >> charges that our nation's prisons are going from punishment to torture, a widespread hunger strike in california's prisons. where is the line between justice and cruel and unusual punishment. and activists paying the price at the border. can it change the face of the argument? we'll hear from them and their opponents. good evening, and welcome to consider this. dozens of prisoners in california are entering their 7th week of hunger strikes to protest solitary confinement. and now a judge says that the prison staff can force feed them if they're starving to death, even if they sign do not resuscitate forms. >> >> reporter: isolation behind bars. californians protesting call it so
and earning money in california fields. the latest congressional battle over labor laws for kids, working in agriculture. >> these people are colliding with other boats. >> some laws of the land tonido apply on water. we invest gate california's laxed boating rules. here's chief investigative reporter tony cobe levgy. >> thank you for joining us. for the next 30 minutes we investigate exposing issues uncovering corruption and holding the powerful accountable. we begin with an investigation that exposed major problems with one of the nation's largest food distributors. problems after our hidden cameras uncovered secret storage places. we discovered major violations of state health code. the investigative unit taking you undercover. you'll see where we found food, raw meat, milk and other perishables sold to restaurants. investigative reporter vicky wynn has the picture, and video that forced the state to move in. >> reporter: don't eat before you swim. that's what mom and dad used to say. but at this san jose swim center, the source of the food could be the problem. for weeks now we've kep
. the university of california is doing work. they're spending millions of dollars at the statement time but they focus their money on where they have their training programs because that's a training hospital and so -- we're able to get a lot of other public functions made accessible by them. so when you look at it, we're not going to have a truly ada compliant facility. that will be billions of dollars but we'll have an accessible building. just building five and putting in toilets, we're trying to be very strategic in what we're doing so we're not putting a toilet in that will become someone's office. we know that clinics will migrate in, so we want to make sure that the toilets we're doing right now becomes the public toilet through that clinic. it's crafty work, but we're very happy with how things are going. it has taken a lot of work. we started on this in 2004. >> am i correct in hearing that you the patient experience of general hospital will improve greatly? >> yes. >> that is the first priority? >> yes. >> okay. thank you. >> we want to be able to create accessible work
of the largest urban municipal solar arrays in the state of california when it was first installed. in fact, i think some of you may be visiting the sunset reservoir on your visit this time. additionally, our solar sector incentive program, go solar s.f., has been working very hard in our city. in fact, in 2007 when it first started, there were only 795 non-municipal solar installations in our city that totaled about 3 megawatts. today that number is nearly quadrupled. we have over 3 40 that total 12 megawatts of power. and this is saving san franciscans more than 4-1/2 million dollars a year on their electrical bills and reducing 6,000 metric tons of co2 in the atmosphere annually. thank you. (applause) >> every bit counts. and many of these installations are becoming the standard rather than the exception and we're focused on installing them in all of our low-income homes and affordable housing developments as we build in this city. and as jerry brown said earlier, we are increasing our population, but we're going to build the right way. our city has also streamlined the permitting process a
>> welcome to "california country." i'm your host, tracy sellers. our first story today involves a family that has taken the lessons of the past to ensure success today and in the future as well. take a walk through your average produce aisle these days and there are more choices than ever, but one farm has a very eye-catching marketing strategy to entice you. and it all has to do with the bright picture of a lile boy named andy. but have you ever stopped to wonder, who is this andy boy guy anyway? >> andy boy's my father, andy d'arrigo, he's the face on the label and a lot of people ask, is there an andy boy and i say, yes, there is. >> who is this? >> yep. it's me. >> oh. ha ha. you see, when folks around here say andy d'arrigo is the face of andy boy produce, they mean it, literally. now 86 years young, he, along with his daughter margaret and son john, run one of the most successful farms in the salinas valley. it all started back in the early 1900s, when andy's dad and uncle emigrated from sicily and went through ellis island. they were both teenagers and spoke barely any en
to bring you a special cnn investigation into a state-sponsored taxpayer funded rehab program in california that gives an eye opening look at fraud and abuse. the program looks like a noble cause on paper. privately run rehab clinics get medicaid money. a year-long investigation by cnn and the center for investigative reporting has found a system riddled with fraud and poor oversight from billing for phony patients to allowing convicted felons to run rehab centers. because it's happening in california, it is big money. state and federal taxpayers are on the hook for tens of millions of dollars every single year. investigative correspondent drew griffin has this report. >> mr. aluno, drew griffin with cnn. george has run a taxpayer funded drug rehab business in southern california for the past six years, which is surprising because for the last 11 years he's been on a list of people banned from billing medicaid. convicted of student loan fraud, george should never have been allowed to even open this clinic called gb medical. i'm asking you a few questions. you seem to be the center of fraud
and earning money in california fields. the latest congressional battle over labor laws for kids working in agriculture. >>> these people are colliding with other boats. >> some laws of the land done apply on the water. we investigate california's lax boating rules. here's chief investigative reporter, tony kovaleski. >> thank you for joining us we investigate, exposing issues, uncovering corruption and holding the powerful accountable. we begin with an investigation that exposed a problem with a large food distributor after our hidden cameras discovered secret storage locations. we take you undercover. you will see where we found food, raw meat, milk and perishables sold to restaurants. vicky nguyen has the pictures. >> reporter: don't eat before you swim. that's what mom and dad used to say. but at this san jose swim center the source of the food could be the problem. for weeks now we kept cameras on these outdoor unrefrigerated sheds in california. they are rented by sysco corporation. if you have ever dined out you have probably eaten sysco food. >> sysco provides every type of food
[captioning made possie by cbyifornia farm bureau federation] >> coming up on "california country," meet a farming family finding a way to give back to their community. then find out why this crop is coming out of the dark literally. next, it's turkey time. learn how to make a new recipe with the holiday favorite. and travel to one of the most unique farmers markets in the stata. it's all ahead, and it starts now. you would think being around watermelons all day, you might get sick of eating the sometimes messy snack, but not for farmer dan van groningen. >> that's good. that's crispy. it's sweet. it's wet. it's everything a watermelon should be. >> but then again, he's had a lot of practice eating watermelons at his family farm in ripon. for more than 70 years now, they've been growing the picnic favorite and have loved every minute of it, seeds and all. >> 1939, we started growin' watermelons the first time. my grandfather did, and, uh, my father was young then, and he would do the harvesting. they would, uh, load the watermelons into small, little trucks and-- and bring 'em to
's not actually technically out of state. they can't deliver into california. they are allowed. there is some advantage to having some diversity in the utilities procurement plans. so that a few resources in california can't drive up the price. so, there's some advantages to keeping the overall price of the portfolio lower if you can have some mix in those resources. >> commissioner king, is that from the previous question? >> i guess. >> any other questions from commissioners? >> [speaker not understood]. >> commissioner josefowitz. >> so, the reason that the bucket 3com ~ bucket 3 compliance targets go down, the mentioned the reasons rps exist. which one of those four does that satisfy? [multiple voices] >> they can go high and go down is to satisfy the goal of hopefully keeping the compliance costs of rps relatively low. to allow in the early year as new generation is being built, to have the utilities have more options in their procurement on where they're buying from. but over time, as resources come online there's less and less need for an unbundled rec in that bucket 3. >> and, so, ju
in the summer, so we have been working with maryland and virginia and all over california and hopefully washington soon and really excited to get everybody interested with the information. >> somebody asked how do you implement a restorative justice program? do you have that answer. >> that's a good question and it's definitely county specific in california they noticed because i have done training in this program in different counties and i always invite the local da and the probation department and there are nuisances in every state and county and everyone wants to help. no one says no. they ask what they need to do to get on board and everybody is making it work and ways of it fitting in their system. >> there are a number of definitions of restorative justice i noticed and going to bullying prevention conversations in the country. some of them areis bad on native american tribal practices and i remember one teacher of restorative justice that did training in a lot of schools and talking about how there was a child who had offended another child. i guess some kind of social aggre
guidelines. here's the photograph of the current at&t application. the south side of california street dribble across the street from the significant property. this photograph was taken when at&t filed their application in 2010. compare this 3 beyond a reasonable doubt photo which is this photo of page of the exhibits that the appellants provided. this is the condo from 2016 site it's completely absent from at&t photographs. this new building is significantly taller than the site and therefore, huh? hover i cared with the owner at&t has never pursued this as at&t is required to do under the guidelines. at&t is also provided no evidence it has considered a described wireless system on light poles. by failing to meet the requirements of the cities requirement guidelines and failing to demonstrate it's all possible alternatives this board can and show overturn the decision and deny this permit for 2016 california street. under the planning code on this district wireless facilities are denied in section 70.90 that prurient to another section they must be located within an imposed building
and possible action to approve san francisco code amendments to the 2013, california building and mechanical and electrical, funding and residential and green building codes and recommend approval to the board of supervisors. >> and i am sorry for the record, could we note that commissioner walker is excused. >> okay. thank you. >> i work to the department and i am secretary to the code advisory committee and we are here to approve a new set of codes, and just by way of a little history, san francisco came up with its own codes right around the turn of the century in 1900 roughly, and 55 years later, i noticed this is in the library and this was the plumbing code, in 1955. and we have every three years, adopts a model code put out by the current version of this as the international building codes and there is also the uniform plumbing code and mechanical code and the residential code and the green building code they start out for a model code and that works for the international. a couple of specific modifications they want to make to it, and every year and so >> and they have taken the laws
. in the largest study of its kind, scientists found that more than half of california sclas rooms studied don't meet state ventilation standards. >> lower ventilation rates were associated with substantial increase in illness absence in the students. >> reporter: the scientist says indoor air pollutants can add up, it can come from the carpet, furniture, dust or even other students who may be sick. indoor pollutants should be diluted with outdoor air through ventilation systems, but for some reason that's not always happening. >> our best guess is they're being operated to save money and energy by bringing in less air. >> reporter: code says they must bring in 7.1 liters per second per person. the median estimate is 5.1 liters per send per person. a bigger issue, the prefabricated buildings. they have a median estimated ventilation rate of 3.1 liters per second. >> my concern as a teacher is i can't educate an empty desk. i really can't. >> reporter: the california teacher's association has fought for years for healthier classrooms. and they say it's clear where the responsibility lies. >> it
>>> good monday morning. coming up on "early today," california's massive wildfire near yosemite is only 7% contained and is now the size of chicago. the situation is syria is becoming dire as the u.s. pushes for proof of chemical weapons and tries to rally an international response. >>> miley cyrus' performance at the mtv video music awards burning up social media around the globe and not for all the right reasons. >>> plus donald trump sued over trump university. >>> new works ahead from j.d. salinger and a baby panda has the country's attention. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for monday, august 26th. >>> good morning. i'm richard lui. firefighters battling a national wildfire in yosemite on high alert. the california rim fire is now the largest in history. this morning, firefighters are being told to protect yosemite at all costs. nbc's jay gray is near the wildfire in tuolumne, california. what are the challenges they are seeing today? >> reporter: good morning. the same as they've been. rugged terrain, high winds. like so many in the area
how california's federally funded medicaid system, midical paid out $94 million, again, your money, in the past two years to drug clinics that show signs of deception or questionable billing practices. among scams, billing for phony patients, drug treatments never provided or treatments the patient didn't need. in one case the patient was dead. it's truly staggering stuff. drew griffin tried to get answers from officials but no one would talk on camera. instead, they couldn't get away from the camera fast enough. two weeks before this investigation began airing, state officials announced action and agreed to sit down and talk. you might ask after seeing tonight's final installment what took them so long and whether their promises to get tough actually add up. drew griffin tonight, keeping them honest. >> reporter: georgia shouldn't be in california's drug rehab business. you seem to be at the center of fraud allegations here. >> no, no, no. >> reporter: he's banned from billing medicaid since 2002 but still billing california. he's accused of fraud length practices at his drug reha
and starts now. [captioninmade possible by california farm bureau federation] >> welcome to the show. i'm your host tracy llers. we're in the beautiful mountains of el dorado county today, which is just a short drive away from sacramento. andhat brings us to our first story. if you're anything like me, you've probably consumed this next produce item at let once this week. that's because it's been called america's favorite vegeble. but we like to call it a reason to get our hands dirty and meet some real potato pioneers. with their adaptability and versatility, it's wonder potatoes are a fan favorite. bad, mashed, diced, or scalloped, no matter how you slice it, from potato chips to french fries d almost anything in between, the potato has been a staple of our diet throughout history and today. and there's no denying we have a special love affair with t spuds. you know, on average, each of us will actually eat 135 pounds of potatoes a year, and in a wide variety of forms. in fact, potatoes are the leading vegetable crop in the united states, with annual total production b
review under the california quality act. the said record is in the reference and two, the board adopts as its own, the planning commission, findings which include the rejection of the project alternatives as a feasible and adoption of the overriding consideration and adopts the program, all is set forth in the planning commission, 18875, and said planning commission motion and the sequa findings in this motion by reference. >> i accept those findings as part of my motion. >> okay. thank you. >> and then if you could call the roll. >> we have a motion and then from commissioner fung to deny the appeal and up hold the section 309 determination of compliance. on the basis that the planning commission did not err in interpretation of the planning code or abused the discretion and with the sequaa finding is red into the record. on that motion. president absent, commissioner hurtado? >> aye. >> lazarus? >> aye. >> honda? >> thank you. >> the vote is 4-0, and the section 309 determination of compliance is upheld on that basis and with those findings, thanks. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> sur
activistas partieron desde varias ciudades de california take map ---incluyendo san jose, sacramento y los angeles... y viajaron hasta la oficina del congresista republicano kevin mccarthy en bakersfield take vo ---donde le pidieron que apoye el proyecto de reforma aprobado por el senado en junio que legalizaria roll open under a unos 11 millones de indocumentados que viven en el pas take 2 box ---mayra tostado nos cuenta mas, adelante mayra. 0:01 0:10 0:29 1:42 intro ---buenas tardes, asi es.. los activistas dicen que mccarthy y los republicanos son el mayor obstaculo para reformar el sistema migratorio y piden que escuchen sus plegarias. pkg el movimiento para lograr una reforma migratoria suena cada vez mas fuerte en california. centenares de vehiculos en todo el estado se dirigieron hoy a bakersfield para exigir ante la oficina del congresista republicano kevin mccarthy que la camara de representantes apruebe una reforma antes de que finalice el aÑo. "l tiene mucha influencia, es el que decide o que exige como deben de votar todos los congresistas en california". lideres sindicales de
to warehouse and to forget. >>> $1 billion plan to expand california's largest reservoir shasta dam caused a flood of controversy. >>> plus the greening of a billionaire who wants to help steer the company's energy policy. >> energy and climate are going to be the challenge for our generation. >>> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to this week in northern california. joining me for insights and analysis of news from the week are craig miller. michael montgomery. and carla marinucci. two prominence speakers came to san francisco this week tackling tough issues and between rating national headlines. attorney general eric holder and hillary clinton. they both addressed the annual meeting of the american bar association. clinton criticized what she sees as an erosion of the voting rights taking sharp aim at north carolina's now voter i.d. law. >> that progress, that historical progress towards a more perfect union will go backwards instead of forwards. >> so, carla, we'll talk in a moment about eric holder. let's discuss hillary clinton. this is just the first speech in a series she wi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,537 (some duplicates have been removed)